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Licensing for Pastoral Ministry School 2010
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Record Enrollment at School for Aspiring Methodist Ministers

Posted on Monday, May 31, 2010 [10:10 AM]
COLUMBIA, Ky. -- The future appears bright for Kentucky Methodism if the last two classes at the Licensing for Pastoral Ministry School is any indication.
A record 52 students attended this year's school, which was held May 23-29 at Lindsey Wilson College. That's eight more than attended the school in 2009, which was then a record enrollment.
The annual school, which is sponsored by the Board of Ordained Ministry of Kentucky Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church, certifies laypersons to serve as pastors and present sacraments in their assigned United Methodist churches.
"We have had to re-design the entire layout of the school because of the large number in this year's class," said Ken Jessee, dean of the school. "But that's certainly good news and that means that we are having a successful year."
 
Jessee said that even with the large number of students at this year's school, the goals did not change, nor did its teaching philosophy. 
 
"The numbers make no difference," Jessee said. "We are trying to put out quality members in every united Methodist congregation. These are laypeople who want to serve the Lord. They've been called into ministry; we have some in college, some in seminary and some are working on a master's degree. We have students from all walks of life: doctors, lawyers, judges, housewives, grandmothers, grandfathers and all kinds of folks. It's a diverse group of people who all love God and want to serve."
 
The school, which attracts students from throughout Kentucky, has been held at Lindsey Wilson's A.P. White Campus for 11 of the last 12 years.
Tina R. Patterson of Louisville, Ky., is a full-time student at Louisville Presbyterian Seminary who attended the school for the first time. She said she was surprised at the level of commitment to teaching and education at the school.
"I have enjoyed myself," Patterson said. "The thing about Methodists is that they go a step further in explaining everything. From baptism to taxes, pastoral care to communion; it's all covered here." 
 
During the weeklong school, LWC's Norma & Glen Hodge Center for Discipleship was covered with books and materials the school provided to students. Patterson remarked that the number of items available to students was a reflection of the school's dedication to equipping everyone.
 
"They gave us enough books to start our own library," she said. "I love to read and learn more, and they've given us everything we need. It's our job to take what we have learned into our fields of ministry."
 
But this year's school -- which attracted eight more students than last year's -- was not all education and no spirituality. Jason Tiller, a Russell Springs, Ky., resident and youth pastor at Asbury United Methodist Church in Campbellsville, Ky., led the music at the school's worship services.
 
"I've been known as the 'guitar man' for the last few days," Tiller said. "The education has been great, but we have also had a refreshing week due to the worship services. I think it's important for us to take time for those things as well. In some ways, this week has been a little like a retreat for the pastors and clergy." 
 
Tiller said he finds it important to have a balance of information and worship at the school.
 
"We get the full effect at this school," he said. "We've had a very good week and we are all looking forward to taking what we have learned and implementing new ideas at our churches."

 

Licensing for Pastoral Ministry School May 2010

Students and teachers of the Licensing for Pastoral Ministry School gather in the Norma
& Glen Hodge Center for Discipleship. A record 52 students attended the annual school,
held on the A.P. White Campus.

COLUMBIA, Ky. -- The future appears bright for Kentucky Methodism if the last two classes at the Licensing for Pastoral Ministry School is any indication.

A record 52 students attended this year's school, which was held May 23-29 at Lindsey Wilson College. That's eight more than attended the school in 2009, which was then a record enrollment.

The annual school, which is sponsored by the Board of Ordained Ministry of Kentucky Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church, certifies laypersons to serve as pastors and present sacraments in their assigned United Methodist churches.

"We have had to re-design the entire layout of the school because of the large number in this year's class," said Ken Jessee, dean of the school. "But that's certainly good news and that means that we are having a successful year."

Jessee said that even with the large number of students at this year's school, the goals did not change, nor did its teaching philosophy. 

"The numbers make no difference," Jessee said. "We are trying to put out quality members in every united Methodist congregation. These are laypeople who want to serve the Lord. They've been called into ministry; we have some in college, some in seminary and some are working on a master's degree. We have students from all walks of life: doctors, lawyers, judges, housewives, grandmothers, grandfathers and all kinds of folks. It's a diverse group of people who all love God and want to serve."

The school, which attracts students from throughout Kentucky, has been held at Lindsey Wilson's A.P. White Campus for 11 of the last 12 years.

Tina R. Patterson of Louisville, Ky., is a full-time student at Louisville Presbyterian Seminary who attended the school for the first time. She said she was surprised at the level of commitment to teaching and education at the school.

"I have enjoyed myself," Patterson said. "The thing about Methodists is that they go a step further in explaining everything. From baptism to taxes, pastoral care to communion; it's all covered here." 

During the weeklong school, LWC's Norma & Glen Hodge Center for Discipleship was covered with books and materials the school provided to students. Patterson remarked that the number of items available to students was a reflection of the school's dedication to equipping everyone.

"They gave us enough books to start our own library," she said. "I love to read and learn more, and they've given us everything we need. It's our job to take what we have learned into our fields of ministry."

But this year's school -- which attracted eight more students than last year's -- was not all education and no spirituality. Jason Tiller, a Russell Springs, Ky., resident and youth pastor at Asbury United Methodist Church in Campbellsville, Ky., led the music at the school's worship services.

"I've been known as the 'guitar man' for the last few days," Tiller said. "The education has been great, but we have also had a refreshing week due to the worship services. I think it's important for us to take time for those things as well. In some ways, this week has been a little like a retreat for the pastors and clergy." 

Tiller said he finds it important to have a balance of information and worship at the school.

"We get the full effect at this school," he said. "We've had a very good week and we are all looking forward to taking what we have learned and implementing new ideas at our churches."

 

 

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